Thursday, March 25, 2010

The Primary Reason We Are A Democracy



"Most people don't vote in the primary," the young candidate observed. "Candidates win with only a small group of people voting."

And yet in a crowded room filled with a medly of New Yorkers, plans were made to change all that, person to person, word to word, handshake to handshake.











previous posts on Reshma Saujani: Stepping out and Then Stepping Into

Reshma Saujani
http://www.reshma2010.com/

4 comments:

cityofstrangers said...

CO - Despite my cynicism about politics, I always vote (in Canada of course - where, it is worth noting, all you need to do is show up with proof of identity and proof of adress to make your mark on a little paper ballot - like the health care system, I've always wondered why voting is so complicated here) - and it's always a good feeling. You can believe in democracy for that one moment.
Good luck to the candidate.

T.

Goggla said...

More people might vote if they kept those old-fashioned lever machines. What fun it is to pull the giant handle over and flip the little knobs. Then ka-THUNK! Your vote is cast! The machine makes it feel that much more important.

ishmael said...

i voted in 2008 for the first time as an adult ( also in kanuckistan) ... most people dont realize that even if yer party dudn't win, the more votes they garner qualifies them for more federal funding. the party i voted for ( green! naturally, pardon the pun) recently lost it's seat in the house depsite being more popular among kanuckistaners than another seperatist party that has a large number of seats in the house. the law of averages continues to stupify me.

in any event, i dig hard on yer project. thx for the insites.


~ ishmael

c.o. moed said...

Goggla, I just had to laugh. I've been dancing with my voting booth for the last 30 years. I think the curtain wasn't broken the first year but after that... THAT's how I remember which district I'm in. I look for the booth with the curtain that doesn't open when you pull the lever!

And Ishmael, thank you so much for sharing your experience! Although always present in our country's culture it seems we each have such an intimate and individual relationship to voting.